Seven elements in solving ethical dilemmas

In this week once again it was Mr. Jamie’s turn to give the ethics lecture. I have studied about seven elements to solve ethical dilemmas. First element is theories. Theories are the ways of understanding the underlying principles of ethical theories called frameworks or systems and the types of dilemmas. As I have learned about ethical frameworks last week, it is a decision making model that can guide us to identify and choose right or wrong.

The second element is conflict. It is an understanding of the types of human conflicts in the times when we face ethical dilemmas. Knowledge about what conflict causes a dilemma can indicate if a dilemma can be solved by ethical standards or not.

Human need is the third element. Human need is an understanding of the types of human need that cause the conflicts. Meeting basic human needs is more important (for survival) than meeting the demands of ethical behaviour.

The fourth element is milieu influences. It is an understanding of the most prevalent decision-making elements in the dilemma’s environment.

The fifth element is maturity level. It is about understanding maturity level of the taken ethical decision. Ethical maturity comes from experience in reflecting and evaluating various perspectives which constitute appropriate and ethical behaviour. In other word, experiences and reflections help people to grow and solve problems.

The sixth element is transfer. It is a way of understanding the most effective communication elements and strategies.

The last element which was taught is guide. It is about effective decision-making model that respects and considers the strongest ethical elements, values, morals and virtues while solving ethical dilemmas.

This week is so advantageous for me. I have gained much knowledge about different perspective in solving ethical dilemmas based on seven elements. To make us more understand about those elements and how it relates to ethical decision making framework that we studied last week, our lecturer gave us one ethical problem.

The situation is when one person promises that he/she will not kill human being. But other person asks if that first person could save hundred innocent children’s lives by picking up a gun to kill one deranged and evil person. Would he kill? If I am asked this question, I would say, I would. I, personally think it is better to kill one evil person rather than losing 100 innocent children. Those children do not have sin. They do not do anything. They are just like white paper. They are the ones who will mobilize this world later. They will be scientist, engineer, politicians, president and so on. Then, how could we sacrifice those children. Better we kill that evil person. If we kill that evil person, we consider divine command ethics and utilitarian ethics. Of course God never allow us to kill but when it comes to kill one evil person or sacrifice 100 innocent children, I surely think that He will command to do so. Besides that, more people benefit from that decision. We can save 100 children as utilitarian say.

In conclusion, I would like to say that seven elements in solving ethical dilemmas and ethical framework help me to make decision which will be beneficial in my life and better me as a human being.

#Natri

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Westernization on Culture

1.1 Introduction Westernization is defined as a process whereby societies come under or adapt to the Western culture. The adoption is done in many aspects as in industry, technology, medicine, politic

Is United Nation an independent body?

The United Nation (UN) is an organisation created in 1945 to promote international cooperation on all aspect of social and economic development. Its objectives include maintaining international peace

THE H1N1 GLOBAL PANDEMIC: A HOAX OR A CONSPIRACY?

1.0 Introduction and Problem Statement It is believed by many that the governments and worldwide organizations like United Nations (UN) are the confidants of all respective nations worldwide. On a pla

© 2021 - Prof. Dr. John B. Parisutham | All rights reserved